Value Ideas Blog
Weekly Links
After I spend a week in Omaha to attend a German value investor conference and the show of Buffett and Munger, we have a couple of more ideas to work on and even more valuable readings. Overall I can say that this week was a unique experience and I have to be deeply grateful to the organisations of the event and particularly to two persons from which I learned the most and have such a great personality. The two guys I owe so much are  M&MMI, thank you guys for all the lessons which you have taught me.   Created with Nokia Smart Cam   I bought Berkshire Hathaway`s letters to shareholders from 1965-2013  for 12 Dollar in a book form, which is a pure bargain for a guy who does not like to read so much on a screen. I will try to summarize them all (after I have finished my studies) and upload them.   Furthermore I`d like to highlight the book “Dream big” which was highlighted by Warren Buffett at the end of the Meeting. You can read a summary here.   You can read the notes of the Meeting here, I would like to highlight WBs answer to the Cost of Capital.   Additionally I would recommend the lessons of failure from the really good moatology blog. As a person who admits to have failed a couple times I can recommend to use such an approach.   Due to the fact that I like entrepreneurship and like to spend my leisure time on edx courses I only can recommend to read about entrepreneurship, strategy  and learn something new in an edx online course! And last but not least I have learned how important a franchise is, so go out and lean-to account for it! (We will try it as well)   And always keep in mind that the intelligent investor estimates likely returns, and invests if the returns are worth the risk.  Most profitable investing takes an uncomfortable view versus the consensus, and buys when the market offers good deals.  If there are no good deals, profitable investing sits on cash, and waits for a better day. Have a great week!    

Intro

The overall banking business model is simple. Banks receive money from clients which are depositors and the capital markets and lend to other clients which are borrowers, therefore banks make a profit from the interest spread. If a bank borrows money from a depositor at 4 percent and lends it out at 6 percent, the bank has earned a 2 percent spread, which is called net interest income. Furthermore banks also earn money from basic fees, assets under management (AUM) and other services, which is usually referred to as income from fees and commissions or simply noninterest income. If we combine net interest income and noninterest income we end up with the net revenues of a bank or its top line. A further point which is less obvious is that consumers are actually paying for the liquidity services as well.

The center of banking is, due to my experience of working for a bank, one thing: risk management. Banks have to deal with three different types of risk: credit, liquidity also known as “Fristentransformation”, and the interest rate environment. Borrowers and lenders pay banks through interest or fees because they are unwilling to manage the risk on their own, or because banks can do it more cheaply. There are only a few other business in the world where you can take money from people and effectively charge them to take it off their hands. That’s the banking and insurance business model in a nutshell.

But there are many banks, asset managers and insurers out there, most of them in the same country and the same business segment and after all, financial products and services tend to be generic. Despite this fact most of the banks and the finance industry earn some decent returns for themselves and their investors, which is a first sign of a potential moat.

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