Value Ideas Blog
Vetropack – Summary
This will be the final summary of our Vetropack series. Here are links to the first two parts: http://frenzel-herzing.com/investment-analysis-vetropack-holding/ http://frenzel-herzing.com/vetropack-analysis-part-2/   We want to start by giving you the most recent numbers (http://www.vetropack.com/htm/presse_detail_3.htm?id=159). The revenue growth was in line with our expectations, just as the decrease in EBIT matched our prediction quite closely. As we have said before, we estimated an average 2.5% revenue growth in the short term. We need to add that all calculations have been done in reporting currency, which is CHF. Most profits occur in EUR though, as one of our great readers has remarked in a comment previously. But it is even more important how the cash is pooled. The CFO has told us that the cash pool that is used for investment is also kept in EUR. So we converted our DCF model. We have made the following assumptions, using the most current numbers:
  • Revenue growth of 2.5% in the short term, 2% in the long term
  • 10.1% CAPEX / revenue
  • 0.63 operating expenses / revenue
  • 0.17 average cost / revenue
  • 0.09 average depreciation, amortization / revenue
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The book: ” The Art of Investing – How the wold’s best Investors beat the market” written by John Heins and Whitney Tilson, who also publish the Valueinvestorinsight, is a collection of value investing quotes by more or less famous investors. Overall, the book is well written and easy to read, but the price of the book is around 25 Euro which, in my mind, is quiet expensive for a collection of quotes. According to the authors the best investors can articulate in a clear and focused way what they’re looking for, why they’re looking for it and where they’re trying to find it. They have a well-defined and consistently applied process for research and analysis. Furthermore value investors understand the micro factors, such as a company’s competitive advantages and only act when they are able to draw a conclusion which incorporate a margin of safety.┬áBecause I stick with the quote of Richard Pzena, here are the best quotes of the book:   Charlie Munger: “All sensible investing is value investing”   Zeke Ashton: “I’ve heard it said many times that value investing is not as much about doing smart things as it is about not doing dumb things”   Lee Atzil: “The first thing is by making sure the potential downside is a small fraction of the upside. That means we avoid stocks that are cheap on an equity-value basis primarily because there’s a mountain of debt. The second important way to have a margin of safety is to have more than one way to win, through earnings growth multiples expansion or free options in the business.”   Seth Klarman: “People should be highly sceptical of anyone’s including their own, ability to predict the future, and instead pursue strategies that can survive whatever may occur.”   read more